Indian Journal of Dermatology
CORRESPONDENCE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 65  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 229-

Author's reply- Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study


Ifeanyi Chibuzor Okpala1, Adeolu Oladayo Akinboro2, Ifeanyi Ogochukwu Ezejoifor1, Abel N Onunu3, Benson Uchechukwu Okwara3,  
1 Department of Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka and Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso and LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria
3 Department of Medicine, Dermatology Unit, University of Benin and University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Adeolu Oladayo Akinboro
Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso and LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
Nigeria




How to cite this article:
Okpala IC, Akinboro AO, Ezejoifor IO, Onunu AN, Okwara BU. Author's reply- Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study.Indian J Dermatol 2020;65:229-229


How to cite this URL:
Okpala IC, Akinboro AO, Ezejoifor IO, Onunu AN, Okwara BU. Author's reply- Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2022 May 16 ];65:229-229
Available from: https://www.e-ijd.org/text.asp?2020/65/3/229/282464


Full Text



Sir,

In response to a letter written to the editor on our article,[1] we thank the author for their interest in our article. Concerning the issues raised on further “methodological limitation” that “might additionally cast suspicions on the accuracy of the study results/recommendations” and worthiness of criteria used, we wish to state the following:

There is an ongoing war regarding the distinct criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, and this has led to the creation of several criteria. The differences in the criteria are based on the cut-off points, and the guideline focuses. IDF criterion may focus more on clinical practice, the ATP criterion focuses on prevention.[2],[3]The use of NCEP-ATP III instead of the updated NCEP-ATP III or other similar criteria that utilized lower cut off points of hyperglycemia and waist circumference could have led to an underestimation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study.Our study, however, did not lose the sight of the limitations which the choice of the NCEP-ATP III criteria could raise as this was mentioned in the discussion of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome.Newer guidelines, some of which are population-based have taken into consideration the particular characteristics of their population in the diagnostic criteria.However, in support of the opinion of the authors on the lack of agreement between various criteria which has been an on-going discussion in the cardiometabolic world, the solution is a population-based criteria. We also support the clarion call for the formulation of the Nigerian national metabolic syndrome criteria that could accurately estimate metabolic syndrome in our population.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Okpala IC, Akinboro AO, Ezejoifor IO, Onunu AN, Okwara BU. Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study. Indian J Dermatol 2019;64:303-10.
2Cheng L, Yan W, Zhu L, Chen Y, Liu J, Xu Y, et al . Comparative analysis of IDF, ATP III and CDS in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome among adult inhabitants in Jiangxi Province, China. PLoS One 2017;12:e0189046.
3Ruan Y, Li R, Yang QD, Li YY, Shi L. Comparison of different diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome in Shanghai adults aged 35–74 years. J Environ Occup Med 2012;29:217-21.